c is the constant of causality

What is between us we can agree on

You are in the right, unhappily

I have mistakenly come and gone

 

If we must be extended in space

braked and breathing with mass

a witness to starlight tracing

always away from us its past

 

on its way to god knows where

The heavens are so vast and desolate

it kills people with sadness & fear—

if there is no absolute sense of it

 

yet there is still c, invariant

on the way from our history

Did we not share in that event

enrapt in beloved isometry?

 

I want to believe in love before

I die and out of my body flies

the last electric thought more

massless and spinning than wise.


R. Charboneau

5 thoughts on “Koan: Lorentz Transformation

  1. It would be nice to believe in something; I’m really not sure that I do. The certainties of science are no so certain it seems. Determinism, cause and effect. Who knows what is real, including life itself. Perhaps a feeble attempt at decency is all one can aim for.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re right, Zeno. I can’t remember who it was, but someone wryly remarked to Einstein once that science had never gotten anything right, to which Einstein did not disagree. Our most prevalent theories about the universe and reality require a willingness, like all transcendent things, to believe in them. I’ve struggled with belief myself, and I think everyone does at some point in their life. I had to build it up in me, brick by brick, with literature and philosophy, finding things I believed were worthy of admiration and imitation (although believing isn’t a permanent state either; these things always have to be reaffirmed). The morality of decency towards one another is, I think, something equally worthy of belief. Kant worked his entire life to turn his belief in this into a principle, the categorical imperative. He believed in it so much that he wanted to make it essential.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. ” Our most prevalent theories about the universe and reality require a willingness, like all transcendent things, to believe in them”. Indeed – there seems little we can view as “fact”.

        Liked by 1 person

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